Monday, June 10, 2013


Poll results from first 11,507 FairFuelUK Supporters. 

A total of 21,000 have completed so far

Q 1. Do you buy fuel for your vehicle at motorway service stations?

City Town

Rural

Suburban

Village

Total

Never

37%

36%

41%

35%

37%

Only if necessary

60%

62%

57%

63%

61%

Yes

2%

3%

2%

2%

2%

Total

4340

1884

2275

3008

11507


 

Q 2. How have your number of visits to motorway services for fuel changed compared to 12 months ago?

City Town

Rural

Suburban

Village

Total

Considerably less

27%

28%

23%

27%

26%

Considerably more

5%

5%

4%

4%

4%

No change

63%

60%

66%

62%

63%

Slightly less

4%

6%

5%

6%

5%

Slightly more

2%

2%

1%

1%

2%

Total

4340

1884

2275

3008

11507


 

Q 3. Do you shop around in your local area for the best fuel prices?

CITY TOWN

RURAL

SUBURBAN

VILLAGE

Total

Never

5%

4%

5%

5%

5%

Sometimes

21%

20%

22%

22%

21%

Yes

74%

76%

73%

74%

74%

Total

4340

1884

2275

3008

11507


 

Q 4. Compared with 12 months ago, what is your level of spending at supermarket fuel courts?

City Town

Rural

Suburban

Village

Total

Considerably less

10%

11%

9%

10%

10%

Considerably more

29%

29%

25%

29%

28%

Slightly less

13%

12%

13%

12%

13%

Slightly more

20%

21%

22%

21%

21%

The same

27%

28%

30%

28%

28%

Total

4,340

1,884

2,275

3,008

11,507


 

Q 5. How do you feel when supermarket petrol or diesel prices vary day to day for no apparent reason?

CITY TOWN

RURAL

SRBURBAN

VILLAGE

Total

Angry

42%

43%

39%

39%

41%

Frustrated

49%

47%

51%

50%

49%

Happy

1%

0%

1%

1%

1%

Indifferent

9%

9%

10%

10%

10%

Total

4,340

1,884

2,275

3,008

11,507


 

Q 6. What is your reaction to special deals from supermarkets offering 5p/10p litre savings that are only available if you purchase products in their store to a specific total amount? E.g. spend over £60 in store

City Town

Rural

Suburban

Village

Total

Feel Conned

44%

42%

41%

42%

43%

Go for it

27%

33%

30%

31%

30%

Indifferent

13%

12%

14%

14%

13%

Totally Ignore

16%

13%

16%

13%

15%

Total

4,340

1,884

2,275

3,008

11,507


 

Q 7. If supermarkets had a clear and consistent national pricing policy without any frills, incentives or gimmicks what would be your reaction?

City Town

Rural

Suburban

Village

Total

Indifferent

12%

14%

14%

13%

13%

Pleased

86%

84%

84%

86%

85%

Unhappy

1%

2%

2%

2%

2%

Total

4,340

1,884

2,275

3,008

11,507


 

Q 8. Is the current price of petrol or diesel forcing you to cut spending elsewhere?

City Town

Rural

Suburban

Village

Total

Considerably

34%

38%

29%

34%

33%

Moderately

48%

45%

51%

48%

48%

No

18%

17%

20%

19%

18%

Total

4,340

1,884

2,275

3,008

11,507


Q 9. What level of fuel pricing per litre would in your personal and realistic opinion help to stimulate growth in the UK Economy?

CITY TOWN

RURAL

SUBURBAN

VILLAGE

Total

Less than £1.00

35%

35%

35%

32%

35%

No Change

1%

0%

1%

1%

1%

£1.00 - £1.10

46%

45%

44%

45%

45%

£1.10 - £1.20

16%

17%

18%

19%

17%

£1.20 - £130

3%

3%

3%

3%

3%

Total

4,340

1,884

2,275

3,008

11,507







Please donate to help the fight for lower fuel prices and a better deal for drivers


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ADD YOUR OWN COMMENTS BELOW THIS POST. THEY ARE VERY WELCOME


[ posted by Graham Gray, 10.06.13 10:54 ]

Could you forward this to all MW service outlets and all supermarkets, just to make sure they get the message

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[ posted by Lesley Strasser, 11.06.13 10:14 ]

These people need to know that our cutting down spending on fuel has a domino effect on the economy as a whole and also affects all types of business

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[ posted by phil robinson, 11.06.13 10:18 ]

come on fairfuel we stopped the shower (minsters) in goverment .now lets stop this rip of britians on the motorways and supermarkets

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[ posted by Jim Holtum, 11.06.13 10:18 ]

Motorists could help reduce the price in their own local area if everyone filled up at the cheapest gas station as I do. This would create competition between the local stations because the ones that are 1 or 2 pence dearer would find their forecourt empty.

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[ posted by Adrian Fry, 11.06.13 10:24 ]

Moto have some balls when they assert that higher prices reflect the cost of running large service areas, as this is simply not reflected in other businesses. It is for instance usually considerably cheaper to shop at a large supermarket than it is at a corner shop, and many places are now open 24 hours and don't charge a premium for that service.

The fact is that motorway service stations are expensive simply because people are not prepared to (or not able to) plan their journey to include refuelling somewhere else off the motorway. As a professional driver, I know of lots of locations where there are garages just off the motorway (for instance the Shell garage actually on the roundabout at J23 of the M6) which are reasonably priced and as a consequence I haven't filled up on a motorway for years. If all motorists boycotted motorway service stations, then they would be forced reduce their fuel prices. I'm afraid it's simple economics and in this capitalist economy, motorists only have themselves to blame.

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[ posted by B Cockman, 11.06.13 10:26 ]

One reason for driving in the middle lane is to avoid having to keep dodging in to it from the inside lane at each entry slip road because the idiots joining the dual carriageway/motorway do not realise that dotted lines mean "GIVE WAY" and match their speed to the traffic before joining the main stream. There used to be public service films on TV showing this when motorways first opened, but now drivers think they can simply barge their way in to the main road.
The same thing happens at many of the mini roundabouts, where drivers simply drive straight across to their required exit without any regard to those coming from the right. EDUCATION and CONSIDERATION!!

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[ posted by Mrs Patricia Easterlow, 11.06.13 10:29 ]

As a pensioner,along with my husband,we are on a limited income.We need a car to visit family who all live over 100 miles away.We cannot spend £50 at Tesco's in one go ,therefore we cannot get the promised x amount on our shopping.They seem to put up prices in store when this promotion is on anyway.They can afford to drop their fuel prices on a permament basis.We cannot use this 'offer'as, if we did ,their would not be enough cash in the 'kitty' for the rest of the week.

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[ posted by Derek Miles, 11.06.13 10:29 ]

Here in TETBURY DIESEL IS BACK TO £I.409,
AS TESCO IS THE ONLY FILLING STATION IN TOWN ,NEXT FILLING STATION FIVE MILES AWAY.
CHEAPEST IS CHIPPENHAM 15 MILES FROM TETBURY.

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[ posted by Frederick Hewitt, 11.06.13 10:30 ]

Two questions:-
Why the big difference in fuel pricing area by area, here is an instance, Llandudno N.Wales ASDA unleaded petrol at the pump (no gimmicks) 132.7p/litre
Northwich cheshire ---- !35.9p/litre and this is the cheapest most are dearer.
Also what happened to the 5p/litre difference between Diesel and unleaded petrol when diesel was the cheaper fuel ?

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[ posted by Alan joyce, 11.06.13 10:39 ]

Having filled in the answers and studied the telegraph article, I am with the majority, but feel that I do not have many choices anyway,living in the Forest of Dean , I can travel many miles and find that I have wasted my time trying to find a penny off possibly.with
Telco juggling their prices to handle special deals in their store.they are certainly not the cheapest.prices around can be £137.9 or £1.43 .9per litre in forecourts around here most of the time.until the governments of this country get serious about prices,the recession will never go away.the problem is where will the shortage of revenue,be made up from.

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[ posted by George Whindcruft, 11.06.13 10:42 ]

Whilst this is not concerned with filling stations per say I was given the impression that some (if not all) supermarket filling stations added more detergents to their fuel so that they could offer it at these discounted prices. Could someone tell me if this is true? Because of this I tend to go for the branded filling station instead.

I also use my GPS to search for cheaper fuel and have driven off the motorway quite a few times to find a local filling station - its not rocket science as long as you have sufficient fuel (of course)....

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[ posted by George Whindcruft, 11.06.13 10:42 ]

Whilst this is not concerned with filling stations per say I was given the impression that some (if not all) supermarket filling stations added more detergents to their fuel so that they could offer it at these discounted prices. Could someone tell me if this is true? Because of this I tend to go for the branded filling station instead.

I also use my GPS to search for cheaper fuel and have driven off the motorway quite a few times to find a local filling station - its not rocket science as long as you have sufficient fuel (of course)....

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[ posted by Jim Wood, 11.06.13 10:48 ]

If we leave the EU we could afford to cut fuel prices (TAX) by 30% and no other tax would have to be increased.
Vote UKIP.

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[ posted by Martin Rosen, 11.06.13 10:52 ]

Why is it with the price of oil either stable or reducing, and the value of £ vs $ increasing, are the petrol companies increasing the price of petrol? Two weeks ago, Sainsbury's increased their price twice in one week by 1p each time, and it has since increased by another 1p.

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[ posted by Peter J Orchard, 11.06.13 10:55 ]

Its painfully obvious, that despite, all the so called investigations into "price fixing", it is still going on, with Sainsbury's the leading contributor in this, in my town there are only two service stations, and both keep the price artificially high. Fortunately I drive down to North London four times a week, so can fill up for a little less, however that said, it is still a very expensive hobby. George Whindcruft, like you I am not sure about these "additives", however all I can say is that since I stopped using Sainsbury's, and changed to ESSO, I am getting approximately another 5 miles per gallon unleaded, doesn't sound a lot but I do approx. 12000 miles per year, so it helps a little.

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[ posted by david foster, 11.06.13 10:55 ]

Living in a small town on a peninsular (felixstowe in Suffolk) Our super market sells diesel at £1.40 per litre, our other service stations also sell diesel at £ 1.40 per litre. so they have us all ends up.
As the next fuel station is approx 8 miles away it would be uneconomical for me to to travel 16 miles for a fuel. I run a motorhome as my only vehicle and get 33-35 to the gallon.
More power to to you. you are doing a great job for us motorists

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[ posted by George Whindcruft, 11.06.13 10:57 ]

posted by B Cockman, June 11, 2013 10:26

Please give this man a medal and a gold star! I agree exactly as I remember battling the elements on a dark storm filled evening on the M62 where I came across some buffoon driving in the middle lane when the inside lane was empty?

Additionally, it seems that on many occasion I have had to give way to those joining the motorway and, as a matter of course, move over to the middle lane to avoid collisions in busy periods.

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[ posted by Eric, 11.06.13 11:04 ]

I had a fuel voucher from Tesco here in Ruthin, but they don't have fuel pumps. If I want to use the voucher I have to make an additional 22 mile round trip to the Tesco branch in Mold, using 3 ltrs of fuel to do it, pointless!!!

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[ posted by Keith Costello, 11.06.13 11:07 ]

A cut in fuel duty would certainly help stimulate the economy, basic economics. Some, if not all and possibly more, of any shortfall could be made up from charging foreign lorries/transport firms for driving on our roads. As far as I am aware foreign drivers do not pay anything at present and the amount of vehicles with foreign registrations seems to be increasing.
As for motorway service prices - it's not just fuel they charge more for. Food, snacks and drinks all cost considerably more. Where there is a lack of competition there will always be companies who will exploit the situation and charge whatever they think they can get away with. They've got a fairly captive customer base so will continue with their charging policies until the general public take matters in to their own hands and start boycotting them and use local suppliers just off motorways. However, if local retailers realise this then what's to stop them increasing their prices and thereby forcing motorists to look further and further afield for cheaper prices? I suppose nothing but I'd still like to see a little competition for the service stations.

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[ posted by Charles Hawkins, 11.06.13 11:09 ]

My heart really goes out to Moto,those poor souls have to keep their service stations open 22Hrs i am positive the rip off prices they charge for food and the rubbish they sell in the shops,plus the machines they have all over the place will more than cover their overheads at the pumps.
Why is diesel more expensive we know it takes about a penny more per litre to produce but surely the gulf between that and petrol is not justified.

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[ posted by Ray Winter, 11.06.13 11:13 ]

Government's just don't get the law of diminishing returns. Price increases equals lower demand, resulting in a lower tax take. Lower prices means an increase in demand, resulting in an increase in the tax revenue.

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[ posted by Paul Hanmore, 11.06.13 11:13 ]

Some motorists really do not seem to 'get it'. A mile from my home there are two fuel outlets. One is a super market currently selling regular for 131.7 p per litre and an establishment selling fuel from a major company. That outfit has always charged considerably more than the super market only 500 yards away and yet I always see plenty of cars filling up there. Admitedley, the super market does not sell super premium but the cars I see at the other place aren't the type to need it. And they don't all look like company cars benefiting from fuel accounts. Are there still some people who believe there is something less wholesome about super market fuels? I had a chat with a super market fuel delivery driver a couple of years ago, who assured me that they collect from the same refinery depot as all the other companies and it is the same fuel for all.

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[ posted by Paul hinchcliffe, 11.06.13 11:16 ]

Why not make an alternative list of filling stations nearest motorway services so people can totally boycott the motorway stations

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[ posted by Dave Wilford, 11.06.13 11:52 ]

The other day my wife and I were in Inverness and instead of returning by the A9 we came back via Beauly and Muir of Ord. On the outskirts of Inverness Esso were selling Diesel at £135.9 but in Muir of Ord less than 15 miles away Gleaner were charging £149.9 a difference of £0.14. How came petrol companies justify such a difference. Off the beaten track in the Highlands with petrol stations few and far between companies such as Gleaner are making a killing.

Concerning supermarket fuel I have been assured by someone in the motor trade that not only does it differ from major company fuel outlets but the gauges are also set to the minimum allowances so thus giving less fuel than indicated

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[ posted by Chris Leeman, 11.06.13 11:59 ]

This results of this poll should be delivered to every MP, every CEO of every Supermarket, all Petrol suppliers and all Petroleum companies. The results clearly show the requirements of the General Public, and also show that a reduction in the price of Petrol/Diesel would be good for the economy.

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[ posted by Iain Barr, 11.06.13 12:18 ]

The TAX on fuel is the real killer! I've just returned from Lanzarote where they sell big brand regular fuel for 1.13 Euros/litre - LESS THAN £1. We need to continue putting more pressure on the Government to reduce the level of taxation, as well as forcing the major retailers and Motorway Services to drop their prices to a realistic level.
Well done FairFuelUK; keep up the good work.

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[ posted by Peter Mayhew, 11.06.13 12:28 ]

As Paul writes in his piece above I cannot understand drivers filling up at fuel stations with a higher price than others that are actually within view on the same road. Perhaps it's a loyalty thing but I use Petrolprices.com and a little sense. If I am traveling to Wales through Telford and Shrewsbury I check the prices and usually end up at Asda in Shrewsbury or Sainsbury's on the bypass and being that much closer to my destination I fill to the brim so that I do not have to use the local garages in Wales with their inflated prices, some of which are 10p per litre dearer than at home. This cannot be delivery costs as there are fuel distribution centres in Wales as there are all over the country. I certainly makes you think when Eddie Stobbard has his own fleet of fuel tankers to supply his depots and it would be interesting to find out what savings he makes by fueling his fleet that way. I used to run my own car for my job rather than the take the car supplied with the job and part of the way to take advantage of claiming mileage was to get the best mpg, buy the cheapest fuel and plan journeys to make sure that I could get fuel from the supermarkets that gave easily obtained money off vouchers and you would be surprised how many folk left their vouchers in their trolleys for others to find. I use motorway service areas for their toilet facilities, somewhere to eat my own food and drink and I would never use the fuel station as they have always been priced well above even the fuel stations that are close to motorway junctions. There used to be a book that you could buy that gave advice on where to obtain cheaper services that were very close to each motorway junction and I find that is very useful. I also wonder about the extra 5 or so pence that is charged for diesel as I accept there is less that can be obtained from each barrel but it still has to go through the same distilation process as petrol so why the big price hike and wasn't there a time when we were encouraged to buy diesel cars as the fuel was going to be cheaper. Another government con.

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[ posted by the tomlowhillbilly, 11.06.13 12:36 ]

For many years I travelled extensively using the motorway network. Even then I regarded the motorway services as a rip-off! But with a couple of supermarket store directories kept permanently in the car it was easy to plan journeys, including fuel and rest breaks, without ever using motorway service stations. The supermarkets weren't doing us any favours, as they manipulated fuel prices depending on local competition; but the cost of fuel and refreshment were always significantly cheaper, and the food at least, was no worse than the stuff available on the motorways.

Unfortunately the supermarkets now occupy such a dominant position as fuel retailers that they can ruthlessly exploit their position without regard for their customers or the national wellbeing. The prices they charge for fuel at their store in my local village is routinely 2 or 3 pence per litre more expensive than the same chain charge in the neighbouring town, and that store in turn is frequently a couple of pence a litre more expensive than they charge in their city stores, barely 20miles away.

In my view the supermarkets ruthless exploitation of their dominant market position is the next banking scandal waiting to happen! And where are the regulators in all this? Oh, that would be the government. The 'Racketeers-in-Chief', who simply levy their protection money on an already overblown pricing structure, and offer nothing whatsoever in return, not even an adequately maintained road infrastructure!!

Keep up the pressure FairFuelUK, because no one in authority gives a monkey's cuss about the poor bloody motorist!!!

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[ posted by David Thorpe, 11.06.13 12:38 ]

I live in the Weston-super-Mare area.The prices for a litre of diesel today at the local supermarkets are as follows: Asda 136.7P :Sainsbury's 136.9P : Morrison's 136.9P :Tesco 136.9P. Apart from the 0.2 pence per litre difference at Asda, these supermarkets keep in step with each other as prices of petrol and diesel move up and down. This certainly appears to be a price-fixing cartel in operation, but of course, they will all deny they are fixing the price. Clearly, there is NO competition in the prices they are all charging.

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[ posted by Lesley Gosling, 11.06.13 12:46 ]

It's interesting that since the slight drop in prices around Budget time, they are beginning to creep up again. Last week my (rather thirsty and older) car needed a full tank before leaving Malvern to head north. I couldn't find the Morrisons petrol station there, so twice had to fill at m/way services - something I would never normally do. Frankley Moto unleaded was over £1.40, as was Esso at Sandbach (£1.419). By contrast Asda at Carlisle was £130.7! Total fuel spend for that 24hr trip was £140. Long journeys are becoming a nightmare. My nearest cheap petrol is Newcastle - 15 miles from where I live where petrol (7 miles away) is £1.47!

In a normal week I am now rationing myself on petrol. The week is planned to allow only that spend. No more driving for pleasure! Dave Wilford is right - we in rural areas are penalised. Keep up the pressure PLEASE.

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[ posted by Les King, 11.06.13 12:52 ]

The only use I make of a Motorway Service Area is for the Toilet facilities.
Would never cross my mind to re-fuel at one. Equally,(and I know this is going 'off thread') would not use the Food Outlets (apart from Tebay) which are an absolute rip-off. Poor quality, invariably scruffy and with indifferent staff.
Back to subject - as someone said earlier, a list of Filling Stns near to Motorway exits would be very useful to drivers.

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[ posted by David Thorpe, 11.06.13 12:54 ]

I live in the Weston-super-Mare area.The prices for a litre of diesel today at the local supermarkets are as follows: Asda 136.7P :Sainsbury's 136.9P : Morrison's 136.9P :Tesco 136.9P. Apart from the 0.2 pence per litre difference at Asda, these supermarkets keep in step with each other as prices of petrol and diesel move up and down. This certainly appears to be a price-fixing cartel in operation, but of course, they will all deny they are fixing the price. Clearly, there is NO competition in the prices they are all charging.

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[ posted by Ashley Whitfield-Greener, 11.06.13 13:12 ]

Why do the government consistantly ignore the calls from pretty much everybody to reduce the duty significantly on fuel?
Its been proved by FairFuel that a drop in duty would stimulate the economy, generate jobs and bring us out of the current financial depression experienced by so many.
Cheaper fuel means goods in our shops will be cheaper as its cheaper to manufacture & get them to the shops. The pound in your pocket will go further, meaning you will have spare income to spend on luxury items. The government like us spending on luxuries, because they can tax them. Because we are buying more, employers will need more staff to produce, distribute and sell the items. This will take people off the dole, and put more money in their pockets, which they will in turn spend in the shops generating more VAT income for the government. Unemployment will reduce, as more people will be able to find available jobs, reducing the unemployment benefit bill. They will all pay income tax (helping the government even further).
With higher income from income tax & VAT collected, and a reduction in the benefits paid out, the government stand to win in every conceivable area. The man on the street will also benefit, as he will now be able to afford the things other societies take for granted, and some luxuries they could not afford before.
Everybody wins. There will be no loosers from cutting fuel duty, so come on Cameron. Pull your finger out. Slash fuel duty now.

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[ posted by Steve Rooney, 11.06.13 13:28 ]

I am 56yrs old when I started driving diesel was the same price as paraffin! Petrol at least 2 thirds more I was told that diesel was a by product of petrol refining true or not I don't know.I do remember adverts saying swap to diesel as its cheaper! Well I am a lorry driver and am amazed that diesel has not just gone up but it has over taken the cost of petrol!! which in turn has caused everything delivered by road to also get more expensive.We have all been mugged by the fuel suppliers and mostly by the government and their mega high fuel taxes.Even if these fuel companies are found to be rigging the cost of crude oil I do not believe there will be anything done to right this wrong or help Jo Public. If rigging has taken place the government have also been raking in extra taxes through this absolute con. Will we all see any kind of rebate I doubt it The government is blinkered in the way it looks at all these large companies and their costing practices in every type fuel/energy supply.ALL THESE COMPANIES PROFITS ARE ROCKETING AND WE ARE ALL SUFFERING THROUGH A GOVERNMENT WITH NO BACKBONE in my opinion

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[ posted by Bill Henry, 11.06.13 13:34 ]

We as a nation are taxed to the very hilt,I'm surprised that we are not taxed on the air that we breathe (maybe I shouldnt have said that,ideas you know), the duty on our fuel is ridiculously high and still the fuel companies make unbelieveable profits,could we as THE CUSTOMERS stage a NO BUY strike on the fuel companies, just wait and see how quickly the country would come to a grinding halt,this sounds a very harsh thing to do but the CUSTOMER is KING and in my book THE KING RULES ,so are we the common public going to stand against the fuel companies and government and rise as THE KING or be treated as downtrodden peasants.

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[ posted by Mrs Capon, 11.06.13 14:22 ]

Like Mrs. Easterlow, I am a widow and pensioner and no way could I spend £60 on a weeks shop, luckily I take my sister-in-law shopping at Tesco's every week and she always gives me the petrol voucher when she spends over £60 and if I don't use it I give it to one of my sons instead of throwing it away. It use to be 5p per litre but the last promotion it was increased to 10p a litre if you spend over £60 whereas it use to be £50 and 5p a litre.

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[ posted by David Dunn, 11.06.13 15:29 ]

Motorway service outlets charge high because they can get it. Profit is their aim, nothing more.
There are enough folk passing who have to buy fuel somewhere and are not prepared to waste their time exiting the motorways to look for better prices. As the vendors sell and therefore buy very large quantities of fuel they will also get better prices from the wholeaslers/ fuel companies, which naturally gives even more profit Supermarkets who offer say 10p off are of course not giving anything away, they are simply using some of their profit to get you back in their store.
All is fair in business, but the government should be aware that most fuel is purchased as a necessary expense, not a luxury like beer and tobacco. So why knock the Motorist with Vat plus Duty Plus Road tax plus insurance Tax.
It simply goes a long way to increase the cost of living and cause inflation. Crazy Logic indeed.

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[ posted by Simon B, 11.06.13 15:48 ]

I always leave any fuel purchases until I have cause to travel the short distance into Stoke on Trent (I live in Sandbach). Tesco closed all bar one of the original 6 filling stations in our town and thus we are now left with some of the most expensive fuel in our area.

The other thing that hacks me off is that diesel is so much more expensive. This has only come about since diesel cars have become more popular (due to the increased thermal efficiency of the engine). This is profiteering pure and simple on behalf of both the government and fuel suppliers - it does not cost as much to refine which is why it always used to be considerably cheaper than petrol.

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[ posted by Iain M. Smith, 11.06.13 16:00 ]

I'll say it yet again; pump price 98pence including all taxes and duty. All the players can afford it; they will still make a profit and the Government will also have a reasonable share.
Everyone, please keep on at your MP; keep this in front of them every day when they open their mail or read their newspaper or check the Radio or TV for news. Well done to everyone who takes part in this campaign.

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[ posted by MRS RAE VERNA BETSWORTH, 11.06.13 16:02 ]

I agree with Steve Rooney, every word; well written Steve... The people running Our Government work for us but they appear to have forgotten, that they are OUR VOICES..... the're too busy working for themselves, greedy so an sos' makes feel absolutely infuriated....... what to do about it ? Sort the Fuel Companies out NOW they have gotten away with daylight robbery for years and years. WHOSE GOT THE B---s ???????????????????

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[ posted by Chas T, 11.06.13 17:07 ]

It's time the breakdown of tax paid for a litre of fuel was displayed on the pumps - as they do in the USA. I'm convinced that the majority of the public are not aware how much duty is collected for evey litre of fuel.

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[ posted by Les, 11.06.13 17:17 ]

Well done FairFuelUK. I have only scanned a few of the comments left by others but nobody seems to have mentioned one important point. When fuel taxation is reduced (and for the good of the country it HAS to be reduced and SOON) it must be accompanied by legislation requiring the savings to be fully passed down all supply chains in the form of lower prices to the end-user. There can't be much that isn't moved by road and so everything currently includes an element of transportation cost. I appreciate that Road Haulage companies have had it tough in recent years but that is no excuse for them being allowed to just pocket any fuel tax reductions as 'extra profit'. Potentially, the cost of everything could be reduced, enabling UK manufacturers to be more competitive (and hence more successful) in world export markets, and so generating increased government revenue that will fund the NEXT round of fuel tax reductions. I see no reason why, in 5 years time, we should not be enjoying similar low fuel prices to those currently paid in the USA. Somebody commented on TV this week that America had bounced back from the recent recession with a growth rate of 4.4%. Surely a large part of that must be down to the fact that they do not have the same millstone of fuel tax around their necks.

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[ posted by James Corbett, 11.06.13 17:27 ]

I have just left junction 21 on M5 after using the motorways & A42 duel carriageway from Sheffield.
The continuous and infuriating habit of heavy goods lorry drivers of sitting in the middle lane (motorways) and blocking the outer lane (duel carriageways), all at one mile per hour or less, difference in speed to other lorries on the inside lane is the worst form of road hogging and extending journey times for the rest of road users.

A £100.00 instant fine via police patrol vehicles or overhead camera records would rapidly solve this form of bad manners and speed up journey times without exceeding speed limits.

I would also happily support similar fines for those drivers guilty of tailgating, thus endangering the lives of fellow road users.

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[ posted by Kim, 11.06.13 17:36 ]

We're are still being ripped off. e.g The price per gallon of petrol in 1980 was £128.50, at 45.20% tax .....There are almost 5 litres to one gallon, I'm sure you can do the sums here !

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[ posted by Neil K, 11.06.13 18:37 ]

I have recently completed a trip up and down the country with in excess of 800 miles traveled, I normally take regular breaks at service stations.

During this trip I didn't visit a motorway service station at all, what I did do was when I needed a break and to refuel I left the motorway at an exit and found a garage close to the motorway, the price was considerably cheaper than the services. Also the services have also lost my purchases for coffee and food...

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[ posted by John, 11.06.13 19:52 ]

I run a diesel car and recently filling my 10L PETROL can to use for my lawn mower & hedge trimmer I wondered how many thousands doing the same. Filling their cans for mowers, generators, jet skis etc the list is endless and in reality we shouldn't be paying fuel duty but I doubt if there is anyway we reclaim the duty.

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[ posted by Alister McAleese, 11.06.13 19:58 ]

We only have two major supermarkets in our area here in Inverclyde, Tesco and Morrisons. I'm convinced that a cartel exists between the two of them. There is never more than 1p of a difference, in the cost of fuel between the two of them.
The other thing which drives me crazy is that I can drive 16-17 miles to Jonston (Renfrewshire), and the fuel there is, on average, 2p-4p per litre cheaper, than anywhere in our area (Inverclyde). Its the same at ASDA supermarkets around the outskirts of Glasgow, heading down the River Clyde to Inverclyde, the prices there are once again 2p-4p per litre cheaper than anywhere else, here in Inverclyde. I would love to ask what the transport costs are, to deliver a full load to ASDA at Ibrox, and the cost of the same delivery to Morrisons Supermarket in Greenock. The price of fuel here in Inverclyde is consistantly dearer than Supermarkets or Garages in the Glasgow area.. This has been going on in this district for Donkey's years, and is never questioned, there can not be that much of a difference in delivery costs between the two areas, to warrant the always dearer fuel prices in Inverclyde.

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[ posted by Thelma Jones, 11.06.13 20:50 ]

We live about 12miles away from the nearest supermarket that sells fuel. Why would I drive there to buy fuel(many do) when there is a garage 2miles from here. On the odd occasion when I have purchased fuel from a supermarket my engine (diesel) plays up. If we don't support our local garage we will lose it and then have to drive a round trip of 24 miles (not far off a gallon of fuel) to fill up. If the tax is reduced on fuel small garages may be able to compete with the supermarkets. The money I would save using their 5p off vouchers would be used in travelling to get there especially as we don't actually go to the supermarket as we have it delivered to save fuel costs.

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[ posted by Robert Clark, 11.06.13 23:02 ]

It is good we might have a go at the government. I wish it might change some of there minds but i am sorry to say most of them are millionaires so it wont make a difference to them. If they had to survive on the low income that most of the UK have to perhaps they would change there minds. If the people of the UK got together and booted them out perhaps they might take notice of what is being said. As for using motorway services the sooner the money grabbing so and so,s wake up the better. I did use the services at Carlisle for over night parking but i even stopped doing that now as the price is £25 for the truck that i drive. I now use an industrial estate and it has cameras to keep an eye on me as well

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[ posted by Alan Mounsey, 12.06.13 07:46 ]

I have a motorhome that averages about 22MPG. A Few years ago I used Morrison's diesel for a long period of time & found my MPG dropped to 19MPG. As a result of this I started to check NOT MPG but MP£100 (Miles per £100 of fuel). I was amazed to find that Shell (normal quality) diesel gave me the best value, followed by BP then ESSO. It is not easy to make comparisons and I had to compare "like by like" journies (eg Motorway, quiet roads, busy roads, moutainous routes etc). As a result I only use supermarket fuel if I have to.

I found that supermarket fuel in Spain was generally as good as branded fuels but sometimes COST MORE than the "Spanish brands", eg CESPA,etc.. I generally found Shell & BP to be expensive and not value for money (MP£100).

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[ posted by Chris B, 12.06.13 09:02 ]

Just an idea: Why don't Fair Fuel UK organise a national motorists boycott of one particular brand of fuel. After about a week of little or no sales at the pumps that brand would be forced to reduce prices in order to tempt people back into their filling stations. When they do that then move the boycott to another brand , with the proviso that, if the first brand put their prices back up the boycott would be reintroduced against them as well. If it was well publicised, and enough people took part in it, it would hit the petrol retailers in the pocket and force them to lower their prices. Surely it has got to be worth a try, hasn't it?

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[ posted by Brian Smith, 12.06.13 09:05 ]

I feel I have to correct B. Cockman regarding motorway driving. When the M1 opened in the 1960's there were huge notices displayed at every entrance. One of the rules displayed told drivers to give way to vehicles entering the motorway, not the other way round. Another rules stated that drivers should stay in the nearside lane except when overtaking. They should never have taken down these signs in the first place because it left it open for drivers to pretty much please themselves how they drive. I'm all for the police targetting ignorant drivers, and I also think new drivers should not be allowed on the motorways until they have at least two years experience behind them on ordinary roads, and even then they should be require to take a test to prove their ability.
Enough said. I should like to finish by saying there is a privately owned filling station in Exeter that charges only £1.30.9p per litre. If they can do it - why can't the supermarkets?

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[ posted by Phil Hoare, 12.06.13 09:42 ]

I am a keen motorist with 2 motorbikes and three cars . I am retired so don't do many miles so on average fill the cars up once a month 'the bikes is more or less between 150 and 200 miles, depends on how fast I go . I take the cars the short distance to ASDA as its the cheapest and easiest access of the supermarkets in the area where I live . For my bikes I try too chose a local cheap supplier as its difficult to pay at the kiosks, having to fiddle with gloves on and off, besides the bikes only hold roughly 4 gallons.

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[ posted by Adrian Edwards, 12.06.13 12:56 ]

If you don't understand why many motorists (me included) use local stations, rather than supermarkets, consider this: when the supermarkets have put all the local petrol stations out of business, they won't neeed to offer cheap fuel anymore and will charge what they like. Support your local station! (but do shop around - use petrolprices.com).

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[ posted by thedrumdoctor, 12.06.13 17:13 ]

Why can't we have hydrogen powered cars like the Honda Clarity instead, as tested on Top Gear by James May? It's not a dream or a joke, it's a reality available for a privelaged few from the Beverley Hills set.

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[ posted by Michael Hollinshead, 13.06.13 21:58 ]

I would have thought that the majority of drivers know when they are going on a long 'run' in their cars. Even today it is not a bad idea to check your fluid levels - including fuel, along with your tyres and light bulbs, before you set out, surely?
I've just been to a funeral, 200 miles away. I did all of the above including topping the diesel tank up at ASDA - £1.369, before I went.
Stopped for a pee on the M/way and discovered fuel at £1.417 for PETROL, almost £8 for a packet of cigarettes and £1.90 for 4 pints of milk! I bought none of them!
PLAN, before you drive!

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[ posted by Alan Summerfield, 13.06.13 23:54 ]

There have been a number of queries about diesel now being more expensive than petrol. I believe that the culprit was Gordon Brown who changed the amount of duty on diesel when he realised that car drivers were changing to diesel in order to travel further for less (I think he saw it as tax avoidance)
There have also been comments about different pricing - I have noticed that fuel gets more expensive the further you are away from a motorway and therefore put it down to extra delivery costs although it could just be a excuse and may not reflect that real extra cost for delivery

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[ posted by Terry Williams, 14.06.13 17:01 ]

I am a long time supporter of "Fair Fuel" and came to the Westminster lobby, I was impressed by the business like manner in which everything was carried out, "No jumping in front of MP cars"?
I have virtually had to stop my business as fuel was causing us to be uncompetitive when quoting for work more than 50 miles from our office, subsequently I changed vehicles to reduce running costs, I paid an extra £900.00 to get a van with a cleaner engine etc, which would reduce road tax.
By the time the van arrived the tax had been removed, where is the incentive in that?
I got rid of the van at a loss, sold my 22mpg car, & now use a car giving me on average 35mpg around town on a motorway trip it will achieve over 40.
Also we do not visit family & friends as often as we used to, a 400 mile round trip would cost around £60.00 in fuel, but that is still cheaper than the train, door to door, quicker, & more comfortable.
The whole transport system needs to be rationalised! At the moment the government, the tax payers, the country, and the economy is loosing out, the building industry is on it's knee's.
All in all the inflated costs in this country is killing it.

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[ posted by h.rawles, 15.06.13 13:40 ]

unfortunately we only have supermarket fuel nearby,the nearest competition is approx. 6 miles away.

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[ posted by Mike Durrant, 20.06.13 23:35 ]

I live in Cambridgshire where fuel is approximately 5p/ltr dearer than the surrounding counties so always fill up when out of the county. My other beef is having to pay VAT, (Value Added Tax ?) on fuel duty which amounts to a tax on a tax. That is immoral if not illegal. And finally, why are fuel companies allowed to charge tenths of a penny for fuel when this is not legal tender, Where can I get a tenth of a penny change????

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