Wednesday, November 28, 2012

We've just posted to 647 MPs a report (see photo of cover) from the National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) that shows over 35,000 jobs will be lost in the UK economy if the 3p Fuel Duty rise goes ahead in January. Not only that, the report shows that growth will be hit by negative 0.1% of GDP. This effect on growth means that the Treasury won’t collect the revenue it is expecting from the rise. You can see the report at http://www.fairfueluk.com/niesr_report.html


This report also included the following letter from me.


Dear MP

Do, please, read this report. I believe it’s ground-breaking and proves how damaging the January 3p fuel duty hike would be. And we're not just talking about losing 35,000 jobs and reducing growth by 0.1%. Fuel duty is a tax on work. 

Some businesses even tell us they're paying up to 50% of their entire sales costs on diesel.

But there's a social cost too. All those redundancies, liquidations and a chain of personal misery, not to mention the behavioural changes caused by high fuel costs. An RAC survey says that 30% of their members now can't afford to see relatives, visit friends or take their children to after-school activities. Fuel duty is a toxic, deeply unpopular and socially divisive tax that's threatening the social interaction of this country.

One of the most chilling observations in this report from The National Institute for Economic and Social Research is that the 3p duty rise could prolong the recession by as much as three more years. 

I'd like a fuel duty reduction too. And that's because it would function as Quantitative Easing for the Ordinary Man. Putting extra money in everybody's pockets - instantly. 

I earnestly hope you'll read this report and make your feeling known to the Government before the Autumn Statement.

I appreciate your support,
Quentin Willson  -  FairFuelUK

 

We’re just days away from the Autumn Statement. We are increasingly hopeful that we will see the 3p Fuel Duty hike scrapped when the Chancellor addresses the House of Commons on 5th December. All the signs are encouraging but we still need to do everything we possibly can in these last few days to keep up the political and media pressure. 





• Fuel Duty • Cut Fuel Duty • FairFuelUK • Quentin Willson • FFUK • NIESR • 3p • RAC 

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[ posted by David parry, 28.11.12 16:28 ]

As a nurse who travels 62 miles each day to and from work any increases in cost significantly impacts on me.
I don't feel this government are concerned about the common people , ie those that work and keep this country running
It will soon become prohibitive for people to work and travel other than locally this will significantly increase unemployment as less people can afford to travel any distance to work.

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[ posted by Sue mcmurray, 28.11.12 16:34 ]

I live in a village in the country so as you will imagine a bus is not frequent or reliable as I have found out. I need a car so I am penalised with rising fuel costs.

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[ posted by Carol Clarke, 28.11.12 16:39 ]

Before the Autumn Statement please consider the ordinary middle class person. 3p fuel will seriously harm us - it puts prices on food and any transported goods.

I hope you take notice of this request

Carol Clarke

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[ posted by Richard Jones, 28.11.12 16:42 ]

The very high levels of fuel prices (to a large degree tax related) are impacting in my own case on my ability to continue my voluntary support of a charity for people with learning difficulties, this involves over 2 days, a commute of 118 miles across a rural country route which could not practically be done by public transport, obviously the high levels of duty are hurting seriously now! Can anybody in government help????

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[ posted by david lawrence, 28.11.12 16:44 ]

I am getting exasperated with this government and the way they are treating the retired people.

I am also aware that I am aslso paying for the petrol that is put into government cars.

You are choking the industries that are trying desperately to do buisness.

Our prices in the shops are all increasing because of the fuel prices.

The knock on effect is disasterous....think twice about this increase

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[ posted by John Johnson, 28.11.12 16:46 ]

This doesnt make economic sense.

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[ posted by Kenneth Berry, 28.11.12 16:53 ]

There are constant reports and statements through various media outlets stating that the any increase in fuel duty will be detrimental to growth and slow down or have a negative impact on the economy.
I have yet to see any official comment from the government side saying anything to the contrary.
Can this be clarified in any way ?

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[ posted by Maggie Wallen, 28.11.12 16:55 ]

Last year i bought a new fiat 500. its a 1200cc so a small engine and as i thought would be fairly cheap to run. When i bought it it cost arond £35.00 to fill up. Now it costs me almost £50.00 to fill up. As i do work in the community as a domcillary carer looking after the elderly i needed a ecomonical car hence buying it. i use my car to travel from home to home so as you can imagine i spend a lot of my wages on fuel. Normally i fill up twice a week. while you may think thats my problem for having a job like i do i have considered changing my job but i would be devastated if i was forced to do that because of rising fuel prices. What if people like myself had to stop doing our job caring for the elderly who would look after them? One day you will be elderly and i hope if ever you need care theres people like me around to look after you. Why oh why do you have to keep hitting the motorist? Please do something before the whole country comes to a standstill. LOWER FUEL PRICES.

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[ posted by Geoff Beard, 28.11.12 16:59 ]

I am a retired airline pilot on a very good pension for which I made considerable contributions during my career. However we are already reduced to one car and have now significantly reduced our levels of social mileage to cut costs. To keep our fuel budget in proportion to our overall budget these measures have been essential. This impacts on family and any real practical support we can give them. It also restricts the travelling we do to leisure facilities and resorts where we might otherwise be fuelling the recovery by spending cash on activities with the grandchildren.
I believe that taxing fuel and therefore mobility can only further slow an already ponderous recovery.

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[ posted by cjcolston, 28.11.12 17:04 ]

The cost of fuel together with a fixed income means that each time I visit my aunt and mother in law I am forced to decide which one.This is because i need to visit both regularly as they are both in their high 90's.As they both live a long way from me each journey takes all day and costs upward of £30 each time. As they become more elderly it is obvious that my visits need to become more frequent. How does a continual increase in fuel duty help me. Should I be unable to continue with this I feel that social services will need to take over at their cost.

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[ posted by John Boreham, 28.11.12 17:04 ]

As an self employed field service engineer, I have to pass these costs on to my customers, if the job then becomes to expensive I will start to loss work.

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[ posted by Richard Wheatley, 28.11.12 17:07 ]

It still seems that an increase in fuel tax is just another excuse to raise cash that will be used for other purposes with the same old excuse being used: these hard times.

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[ posted by Philip Robinson, 28.11.12 17:09 ]

I have heard that people are using premium paraffin and up to 20% new sunflower oil in their diesels. It works out, I believe, to be £1.07 per litre ?

Can this be right?

I would have thought it illegal. Paraffin is dyed blue, and presumably turns greenish with the yellow oil. Its outrageous that some people have to do this and will be fined a fortune and have their car crushed. These poor people; to think they have to go to these lengths because they cant afford £1.45 a litre in rural districts. Still MP's who earn £65k a year, plus flat allowance wont have to do this. They are the same people who have an MA from Oxford just by sending a £10 note 21 weeks after matriculation? Amazing isn't it. Just think an MA without any work, AND £65k a year.

Its OK for some.

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[ posted by Bob Chaloner, 28.11.12 17:11 ]

We in Britain seem to bear the brunt of excessive fuel charges. I, like many other people, have travellled round the world and have seen the price of fuel in other countries. In nearly every place fuel is significantly cheaper than here in the U.K.
and in some of these countries it has to be hauled far further than here. It's time U.K. motorists stood up and said enough is enough.

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[ posted by pat newman, 28.11.12 17:12 ]

I honestly believe that if the chancellor raises duty by 3p in january then he will be putting more and more families in debt and unable to live a normal life. And think of how many more people will be made unemployed through this greedy tax, it will also make a joke of their unemployment figures which I have to say are not true there is not a reduction in unemployment, the figures are just moved around from job seekers to other benefits. So please don't raise duty, ever, in fact do away with it.

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[ posted by Chez, 28.11.12 17:17 ]

I also feel and have for a long time that the duty is an unbalanced tax. We own a van, use 2 other cars in our family of 4. So we are adding an awful lot of revenue each week to the government coffers. People who do not use cars are not sharing their part of the tax burden so it is very partial in its implementation. The cost of fuel was one of the factors that made me move house as I was commuting from Gloucester to malvern with a heavy laden van - just could not cut costs. Balance is needed for any tax system.

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[ posted by Terence Seal, 28.11.12 17:17 ]

We are fed up of being ripped off by fuel companies and successive governments and will remember when elections come round.

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[ posted by Mr Michael Brennan, 28.11.12 17:20 ]

The government should also consider howl this increase, on top of all the other inflation busting increases (travel, energy food) are affecting the old and young.

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[ posted by david lawrence, 28.11.12 17:45 ]

I am getting exasperated with this government and the way they are treating the retired people.

I am also aware that I am aslso paying for the petrol that is put into government cars.

You are choking the industries that are trying desperately to do buisness.

Our prices in the shops are all increasing because of the fuel prices.

The knock on effect is disasterous....think twice about this increase

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[ posted by Brian Souter, 28.11.12 17:53 ]

Successive governments have assumed that the taxpayer has bottomless pockets. It surprises me that no commentators have noticed that MP's are earning more than twice the national average salary, and consequently are not effected by the very taxes that they impose on the man in the street. MPs do not understand that cheap fuel is a basic necessity for economic growth.

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[ posted by Dave Redpath, 28.11.12 18:26 ]

Why does the price of fuel vary so much across the country? It normally is considerably cheaper in urban areas where there is alternative transport available. In rural areas where it is a necessary to run a car the price is considerably higher. Are we all sharing the pain together not really!

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[ posted by Elke, 28.11.12 18:54 ]

It's detrimental to the economy and in particular small business people like myself - it's impossible to keep on passing the rising costs to customers and clients and it seems that the government is hell-bent on wrecking the economy further.

When are those in charge of all this going to wake up and smell the coffee? We're all in this together? haha, who's WE - those who have or those who have not?

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[ posted by john dean, 28.11.12 19:02 ]

Just how much punishment do we have to take, the banks push us into the deepest recession in living memory, and get a slap on the wrist, grotesque boneses, still being payed, fuel price increases hurt the ordinary working people, industries and distribution that drive this economy, you do (NOTHING) but then again you dont have to on your salaries, you should try living in the real world. About time this country woke up and kicked you lot into touch, all mouth and no substance. If we are all expected to make sacrefices,we could make a start by capping city salaries and bonuses, and maybe a tightening of your own belts ie expence accounts. Then and only then will you gleen some respect.

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[ posted by Gillian Hackney, 28.11.12 19:12 ]

I live in a very rural area of Devon if I could not use my car I would be housebound for all but two days of the week I would not be able to work as I would have no means of getting there. At present it costs me one weeks pay per month to get to work if fuel costs rise much more it would not be cost effective to go to work and I may as well be signing on.

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[ posted by john Dennett, 28.11.12 19:22 ]

I believe the government need to stop sending aid to third world countries and check in there own house to save money like not using tax payers money to purchase apple I-pods for there staff

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[ posted by Hugh Wyndham-Smith, 28.11.12 20:22 ]

As a local self employed builder I spend around £90=00 per week on petrol to get to jobs around where I live 15 mile radius this is a significant amount of my turnover and efects my competitiveness.Please help me to stay in work my customers who are largly retired people on fixed incomes can not aford to employ me.(even though my rates are lower now than in 2005.
I understand that petrol is around 0.45 pence wholesale before tax why are we penalising ourselves as a country its a no-brainer cut fuel tax and get Britain working again!

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[ posted by David Secretan, 28.11.12 20:27 ]

I have over the last few years found it increasingly difficult for me to justify working. I may as well claim all the benefits that are available to me and sit on my backside and keep the money rolling in. It appears to me that the government wants to penalise those that choose to work, by increasing the ever increasing costs of daily living. Reduce the cost of fuel put money back into the public's pocket and see the country start to regenerate itself. The high cost of fuel affects each and every individual within the UK. Do not apply this increase.

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[ posted by Karina Nelson, 28.11.12 20:28 ]

Having to use my car for work and receiving the pathetic minimal amount to supposedly cover fuel used for work purposes, the price hikes are not covering this fuel, let alone the wear and tear on my only means of doing my job. If the cost goes any higher, this will force me to consider resignation to enable me to sell my family sized saloon car (size needed to carry my training materials), and replace it with a smaller economical vehicle. Why can't this government understand that higher fuel prices drastically reduces any chance of a growing economy??!!!!!!

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[ posted by Raymond Kelly, 28.11.12 20:45 ]

Yesterday 27 Nov 12 when I was reading through Text on BBC news there was a brief statement that the Chancellor for the Conservative party was considering putting up VAT to 25%, just as I was about to read the next page it disappeared of screen. If there is any truth or talk behind doors regarding this what chance have we as tax payers trying to persuade the government to reduce the taxes on fuels , we are doomed lets get real only the fat cats will be able to survive and of coarse the MP's as their salaries will hold out for any thing they dream up that they think will balance the deficit, as they (the government) impose even higher taxes on motorists.

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[ posted by Roger Amis, 28.11.12 21:26 ]

As someone on a small works pensionand living in a rural area of Scotland I need the car to get about as I do not qualify for free public transport - bus fares up here are rather high - making the car a better bet. any rise in fuel duty would depleet my already small amount of spare cash I have after paying necessary bills. We do not all have high paid jobs and can claim expenses for the most trifling of things. Scrapping the duty rise will help the less well off and hopefully food prices will not increase yet again because of a rise in fuel prices.

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[ posted by Andy Laing, 28.11.12 21:45 ]

I live in a small village in the west highlands and travel all over the area in my work as I am a self employed joiner and obviously rely on my van to carry tools and material as most people do but here is the crunch I am paying 149.9 pence per ltr for my fuel just recently we travelled to Aberdeen and on the way back we passed a petrol station selling diesel for 137.7 p per ltr a difference of 12p where is the balance in any of these fuel costs. I keep hearing about market forces and the recession It is a load of nonsense the way we are treated in this country in the last few months I have been told by various companies that my bills would be increasing 1 electricity 2 mobile phone bill 3 milk 4 central heating oil just a few of the things so it makes think these companies dont seem to be affected by the recession and our government just sits back and lets it happen (happy shareholders springs to mind) come on get real and give us a chance and an an economic recovery might just be possible

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[ posted by Sally Stanistreet, 28.11.12 23:58 ]

I cannot believe the government want to put more duty on fuel, We need to be thinking about our own working people and help them to carry on working not keep giving money to the immigrants & spongers of this country

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[ posted by Andy Joyce, 29.11.12 10:15 ]

The problem i see is that the government just think of taking and not giving a bit back to make more. It is a very short sighted view.

If you want the consumer to buy things to help the economy grow, you actually have to give them the spare change to use. I know that i need a certain amount of fuel each week to go to work. (whilst I still have a job!) That means as the price of fuel goes up, my free cash goes down. I am not going to get a pay rise every time the fuel goes up! This means that money comes from the account, leaving less and less for things i need, and very short for the things that I want. Hence spend less in the shops to help this country get out of the recession.

If you free up cash people will buy things! Things will move from warehouse to shop to customer. Its not rocket science!
There are other implications of lowering the fuel duty in this country. If you think about everything that is imported has to come on ships, planes or trucks. When they come here they will only fuel what is needed to get out. Truck drivers will put a splash and go just to get out of the country. If the cost of fuel was say, the lowest in Europe, (I know, very hard to even comprehend!) then those thousands of trucks that come into our country every week would fill there 1100 liter tanks here and not in say Belgium. PUTTING HUGE AMOUNTS OF MONEY BACK INTO OUR COFFERS!! Same as the road tax for these trucks. I know we are in the process of getting these foreign trucks to pay, but its taken so long for us to take what the rest of Europe have been doing for such a long time!!

PLEASE LISTEN TO US!!

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[ posted by Alan Womack, 29.11.12 10:20 ]

Diesel is as far as I am aware, a by-product of producing petrol (therefore a waste product), perhaps the question which should be asked is why is the price of this by-product so high?

But then as long as our governments insist on sending billions of pounds of our taxes abroad every year instead of spending the money on those who pay the taxes then the cost of living in this country will remain exorbitant.

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[ posted by ken vaughan, 29.11.12 10:23 ]

I cannot believe the government want to put more duty on fuel, We need to be thinking about our own working people and help them to carry on working not keep giving money to the immigrants & spongers of this country
also to be thinking of our elderly ie: pensioners and diabled people who need to be to use their cars etc: I also agree that taking the taxie's off the price of fuel would encourage and create new jobs enterprises.

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[ posted by Andy Joyce, 29.11.12 10:33 ]

The problem i see is that the government just think of taking and not giving a bit back to make more. It is a very short sighted view.

If you want the consumer to buy things to help the economy grow, you actually have to give them the spare change to use. I know that i need a certain amount of fuel each week to go to work. (whilst I still have a job!) That means as the price of fuel goes up, my free cash goes down. I am not going to get a pay rise every time the fuel goes up! This means that money comes from the account, leaving less and less for things i need, and very short for the things that I want. Hence spend less in the shops to help this country get out of the recession.

If you free up cash people will buy things! Things will move from warehouse to shop to customer. Its not rocket science!
There are other implications of lowering the fuel duty in this country. If you think about everything that is imported has to come on ships, planes or trucks. When they come here they will only fuel what is needed to get out. Truck drivers will put a splash and go just to get out of the country. If the cost of fuel was say, the lowest in Europe, (I know, very hard to even comprehend!) then those thousands of trucks that come into our country every week would fill there 1100 liter tanks here and not in say Belgium. PUTTING HUGE AMOUNTS OF MONEY BACK INTO OUR COFFERS!! Same as the road tax for these trucks. I know we are in the process of getting these foreign trucks to pay, but its taken so long for us to take what the rest of Europe have been doing for such a long time!!

PLEASE LISTEN TO US!!

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[ posted by Jackie Willis, 29.11.12 10:37 ]

As a driving instructor I am suffering a triple whammy from these crippling fuel prices, made ever more crippling by a short-sighted government who can see no further than fuel prices to raise income, now that smokers have all but disappeared! My triple whammy is:
1. Fuel price increases reduce my profit, therefore my income from driving lessons.
2. There are fewer learners to go around the increased number of instructors as the learners/their parents don't have the money to afford lessons. So I'm earning less from my job as a driving instructor.
3. I have to limit the use of my car to save the fuel for the few lessons I have. This has meant completely cutting out visits to friends, not good for me as I live alone and have no family. Shopping has to be incorporated into the times when I have lessons or an important meeting. It's got to the stage I'm scared to go out in the car in case I end up with no fuel and no money in the bank or in my purse to pay for it! I'm worse off now than ever before in my life, even when I was a student in the early 70s!
I don't see how any intelligent person can believe raising the price of something so essential to the whole economy will help solve our financial problems as a nation! Raisiing fuel prices causes price increases on absolutely everything, and everyone is affected, every business, every individual, whether or not they drive, our food, our deliveries, in fact the only business to remain unaffected by fuel price rises are home-based busineses offering an online service as opposed to goods - but even they will be affected by increases in domestic fuel to heat their home! It beggars belief! Not only should this nonsensical rise be scrapped, fuel duty should be dramatically reduced to kick-start the economy!

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[ posted by Peter Hornsey, 29.11.12 11:34 ]

The effect on my company's ability to remain trdaing is seriously hampered by the ever increasing cost of fuel for our fleet of lorries.
Despite making major cut backs two years ago we have to maintain our current fleet size to service our customrs. Another rise in the cost of fuel duty might just tip us over the edge and a company employing over 60 people and in business for over 60 years may cease to exist.
I hope the chancellor is listening.

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[ posted by David Young, 29.11.12 13:26 ]

How can this government not see that a further rise in fuel duty would cripple the working man even further than is already happening. The price of fuel is a disgrace to start with and I cannot see why there is such a fluctuation when oil prices are fairly stable at the moment.
We should also have a full inquiry into the fuel price fixing by all the oil companies and just who is actually profiting by this rape of the motorists of this country.
Please, if you do anything for your consituents. Get this sorted out.

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[ posted by Lynda Vickery, 29.11.12 16:56 ]

I live in a smal rural country town in north Devon. Fuel is expensive and we are also reliant on oil for our central heating. Petrol con't keep going up like this especially in the rural areas where we have very little alternative . I would like to see the Politicians cope in a rural enviroment without a car; perhaps they ought to try it for a month and then see how they feel about the price of fuel .

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[ posted by Ellis James, 29.11.12 19:09 ]

Yes, I know everyone likes to have a moan when prices rise in certain things but what many people don't realise is just a matter of 3p more on top of fuel puts all the prices up! Wether it's public transport, your local delivery service or to every single thing you buy in the shops! It's all effected and works in a big vishouse circle. I am curently self employed and have been for many years now doing professional landscaping. I used to work within a huge area all over the country but now when a customer asks for a quote I've got to ask myself, is this really worth my time travel cost wise or do i add that reduculouse fuel cost onto the final cost for the job then give the customer a heart attack?

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[ posted by Mel Atkinson, 29.11.12 19:24 ]

My interest is classic cars, an industry which some people claim generates about three billion pounds a year for the national economy. This year attendance at the shows has been right down because people can no longer afford the fuel to attend

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[ posted by Jim Gilmour, 30.11.12 16:03 ]

Please just think about the hike in fuel, once again it will push up inflation put some smaller companies out of business, 3p
on fuel is once again hurting the ordinary man as well as small busineses. Again that will increase the price of food and all things we all buy when the bankers get away scott free, nobody has had to pay for the mess except the working man and small busineses, so i beg all the MP's do not vote to have this increase please

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[ posted by Bryan Donald, 01.12.12 22:33 ]

The excessive price of fuel i believe is the cause of why many drivers are seen in their cars with a light off, be it headlamp rear brake and from what i have noticed it appears to be on the increase.

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[ posted by Bill munro, 02.12.12 10:05 ]

Give British businesses a chance to be more profitable and thus more able to grow, to employ more people, make more of their employees fully employed and not underemployed and pay better wages by reducing the burden of excess fuel duty

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[ posted by Ray Cardew, 02.12.12 10:53 ]

M P,s listen to your electorate, we the rank and file public put you there , we can just as well not vote for you, next time round..

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[ posted by Derek Price, 02.12.12 11:24 ]

We must stop talking about the increase as a 3p increase and start talking about the increase as a 16p increase. Quoting the increase as an increase per litre minimises the perception and plays into the methodology used by our politicians to "soften" the information. This increase will add £2.00 to every fill up. That's an extra £100 per year for anyone in the rural economy..probably the same in our metropolitan areas as traffic accounts for much fuel use. It's just another tax collection method without the paperwork. Get more intense with the message Quentin!!!

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[ posted by Norman Atkinson, 04.12.12 23:01 ]

My friends who live in Plymouth Mass USA could not believe how much the cost of fuel was in England when they stayed last week, the average price of diesel in Plymouth is approx $4 (per gallon)=£2.48 if my sums are correct = £0.80p per Ltr

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[ posted by J.M.Woodward, 06.12.12 09:11 ]

Well done Fairfuel U.K.The 3p rise in duty has now been cancelled,no doubt thanks to your push.
The price of petrol in my area has dropped from £139.9,to £129.9,all of a sudden.The government has not remove a load of tax/duty,and I've not heard of a significant drop in the price of crude,so your campaign about profiteering seems to be working as well.
Congratulations.

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