Friday, March 2, 2012
I and FairFuelUK have been saying this for ages; we pay tax on our earnings so that we can buy these vital commodities then we pay VAT on the fuel duty. The Europe league table of fuel duty levels is one which we should not be top of. Tomorrow we will be meeting the Treasury to demonstrate that a cut in duty will help treasury revenues not harm them

EU MEMBER 

STATE

Price excluding duty (pence per litre)

Fuel Duty (pence per litre)

Net Selling price (pence per litre)

Variation on UK price(pence per litre)

United Kingdom

61.34

57.95

119.29

0.00

Italy

68.04

49.61

117.66

-1.64

Sweden

66.51

44.29

110.80

-8.49

Ireland

59.54

41.74

101.28

-18.01

Germany

68.12

39.34

107.47

-11.83

Finland

69.07

38.71

107.78

-11.51

Czech Republic

65.89

36.77

102.66

-16.63

France

62.71

36.76

99.47

-19.83

Netherlands

64.97

36.53

101.49

-17.80

Austria

62.60

36.51

99.11

-20.18

Belgium

68.17

35.77

103.94

-15.35

Greece

69.84

35.69

105.54

-13.76

Slovakia

66.34

33.96

100.30

-19.00

Denmark

68.89

33.36

102.25

-17.04

Hungary

67.12

33.05

100.16

-19.13

Estonia

64.72

32.86

97.58

-21.71

Malta

63.71

31.98

95.69

-23.60

Portugal

68.50

30.64

99.14

-20.15

Slovenia

60.29

30.46

90.75

-28.54

Spain

67.71

29.28

96.99

-22.31

Latvia

65.61

29.25

94.85

-24.44

Poland

64.28

29.02

93.29

-26.00

Cyprus

67.92

28.50

96.42

-22.88

Luxembourg

64.83

27.60

92.43

-26.86

Bulgaria

60.73

26.94

87.67

-31.62

Romania

62.96

26.11

89.08

-30.22

Lithuania

67.07

25.27

92.33

-26.96

EU average (excluding UK)

65.62

33.85

99.47

-19.83




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[ posted by Fed up, 27.02.12 16:10 ]

Mad how potless Greece, a country deep in the brown stuff, are paying roughly 14p per litre less than we do. Says it all.

Even cutting the fuel duty to level with the EU average would be a start.

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[ posted by Ian Stevenson, 28.02.12 09:13 ]

Not only are paying the most for fuel we are also paying for roadfund licence (tax disc).The argument used to be that we had lower fuel prices then europe because their total cost included the road fund. Now its a double whammy. We all have to pay tax to fund the services we need such as police, fire and rescue, road maintenance, NHS etc and that is as it should be. What needs to happen is a wholesale review of how efficiently what we pay is being used. I have seen first hand the waste thast occurs in governement departments (DWP and Jobcentre plus) and councils (Manchester City and Leicester City) I believe we could easily provide the services we need with a 20% reduction in overall tax. What a boost to the economy that would be.

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[ posted by Shaun winter, 28.02.12 18:49 ]

Help help how lone can we go on

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[ posted by Mark Bell, 04.03.12 21:20 ]

The protest at Westminster on the 7th March got me thinking about MP's, is it the case that their transport costs for getting about are met in full by treasury funds i.e. their private cars,fuel,roadtax e.t.c.

Most company's directors & MD's dont actually have to pay for there fuel, it is deemed a perk and paid by the company accounts which is why they dont feel the cost burden that most of us do, remove
the "Perk" in both cases and you may then see greater concern by the decision makers!!!

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[ posted by steven, 07.03.12 18:43 ]

Mark,

Fuel provided by a company to an employee, even a director, is a taxable benefit. If you don't cover a lot of miles you're actually worse off with fuel as a 'perk'. I know, my missus is an MD and doesn't take fuel as a benefit because she does less than 6000/annum in her car. It would actually cost her more in tax to have fuel as a 'perk'. You are right on one thing though, changing the price of fuel won't affect them, you pay the same amount no matter how far you drive. Weekend in the country or a trip to the south of france, it costs them nothing but the taxable benefit.

The bigger issue is that the government are punishing car drivers in all directions, and even more so the hard working car drivers.

If you earn over £40k you pay a higher rate of income tax. If you earn more than £40k you probably won't choose a car based on its economy, so you end up filling up the car more often, thereby paying evn more tax. Then to add insult to injury, you pay more road tax too!

The whole country is a joke! Punish the guy who sets out to be successful!

If the govenrment gave out food stamps to the 'low earners' and unemployed rather than somebody elses hard earned cash, those on the receiving end couldn't spend it on 'fags and booze' the problem then is that the govenrment wouldn't see 30% of what their giving out coming back to them in tax!

Rant.....oh yes, I can rant!

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[ posted by Fred, 07.03.12 19:09 ]

If fuel duty was reduced to be in line with the European average it would be a start, we'd see diesel prices of around 115ppl (23p duty and approx 7p from the VAT knocked off) and petrol prices of about 109ppl: still too high but a bit bearable than what we're getting right now.

The Treasury are living in a cuckoo land if they keep peddling out this industrial strength nonsense that they cannot afford to cut fuel duty. So much money is getting sent abroad, whether it be foreign aid or payments to the EU. They forget about economies of scale and long-term solutions, whilst cutting duty may mean a loss to them in the short term, it will pay long term dividents as people would have more expendible income. At the moment we have none, because we're having to spend it on fuel. I'm having to spend about a ninth of my annual salary just to drive to work, the rest has to go on the mortgage, bills and so on, leaving me hardly any spare cash for anything. This time three years ago I was on the same salary, and petrol was 84p per litre, and I had far more dispendable income. Even that could have been lower but for then-chancellor Darling's apparent anti-motorist agenda putting in three 2p duty rises in the space of 12 months.

Now we pay about 84p per litre in tax. The UK government has used the poor old motorist as a cash cow for too long, we have had enough!

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[ posted by Anthony, 22.03.12 07:50 ]

Remember the outrage when fuel prices broke the £1 a litre mark? Following the budget it will break the £1.50 mark and we simply go on taking it and shaking our heads and moaning. It will NEVER go back to anywhere near £1 per litre.

We need to stop moaning and take action: strikes, fuel blockades, protests. This can only be reversed with people power. At this rate expect to pay £2 a litre...

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[ posted by Beth, 27.03.12 11:15 ]

Article 23.1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights states:

"Everyone has the right to work, to free choice of employment, to just and favourable conditions of work and to protection against unemployment."

The way the price of fuel is increasing in this country, it may not be long before my "rights" are violated, because I won't be able to afford to drive to work. I can only get to my place of work by car LOL.

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